Nobody likes a do-gooder – another reason for e-learning not mainstreaming?

Came across the article, “Nobody likes a do-gooder: Study confirms selfless behaviour is alienating” from the Daily Mail via Morgaine’s amplify. I’m wondering if there’s a connection between this and the chasm in the adoption of instructional technology identified by Geoghegan (1994)

The chasm

Back in 1994, Geoghegan draw on Moore’s Crossing the Chasm to explain why instructional technology wasn’t being adopted by the majority of university academics. The suggestion is that there is a significant difference between the early adopters of instructional technology and the early majority. That what works for one group, doesn’t work for the others. There is a chasm. Geoghegan (1994) also suggested that the “technologists alliance” – vendors of instructional technology and the university folk charged with supporting instructional technology – adopt approaches that work for the early adopters, not the early majority.

Nobody likes do-gooders

The Daily Mail article reports on some psychological research that draws some conclusions about how “do-gooders” are seen by the majority

Researchers say do-gooders come to be resented because they ‘raise the bar’ for what is expected of everyone.

This resonates with my experience as an early adopter and more broadly with observations of higher education. The early adopters, those really keen on learning and teaching are seen a bit differently by those that aren’t keen. I wonder if the “raise the bar” issue applies? Would imagine this could be quite common in a higher education environment where research retains its primacy, but universities are under increasing pressure to improve their learning and teaching. And more importantly show to everyone that they have improved.

The complete study is outlined in a journal article.

References

Geoghegan, W. (1994). Whatever happened to instructional technology? Paper presented at the 22nd Annual Conferences of the International Business Schools Computing Association, Baltimore, MD.

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