Dilbert as an expository instantiation

A few recent posts have been first draft excerpts from my Information Systems Design Theory (ISDT) from emergent university e-learning systems. Being academics and hence somewhat pedantic about these things there are meant to be a number of specific components of an ISDT. One of these is the expository instantiation that is meant to act as both an explanatory device and a platform for testing (Gregor and Jones, 2007) i.e. it’s meant to help explain the theory and also examples of testing the theory.

The trouble is that today’s Dilbert cartoon is probably as good an explanation of what is currently the third principle of implementation for my ISDT.

Dilbert.com

I’m sure that most folk working in a context where they’ve had to use a corporate information system have experienced something like this. A small change – either to fix a problem or improve the system – simply can’t be made because of the nature of the technology or the processes used to make the changes. The inability to make these changes is a major problem for enterprise systems.

The idea from the ISDT is that the development and support team for an emergent university e-learning system should be able to make small scale changes quickly without having to push them up the governance hierarchy. Where possible the team should have the skills, insight, judgement and trust so that “small scale” is actually quite large.

An example

The Webfuse e-learning system that informed much the ISDT provides one example. Behrens (2009) quotes a user of Webfuse about one example of how it was responsive

I remember talking to [a Webfuse developer] and saying how I was having these problems with uploading our final results into [the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system] for the faculty. He basically said, “No problem, we can get our system to handle that”… and ‘Hey presto!’ there was this new piece of functionality added to the system… You felt really involved… You didn’t feel as though you had to jump through hoops to get something done.

Then this is compared with a quote from one of the managers responsible for the enterprise system

We just can’t react in the same way that the Webfuse system can, we are dealing with a really large and complex ERP system. We also have to keep any changes to a minimum because of the fact that it is an ERP. I can see why users get so frustrated with the central system and our support of it. Sometimes, with all the processes we deal with it can take weeks, months, years and sometimes never to get a response back to the user.

Is that Dilbert or what?

The problem with LMS

Fulfilling this requirement is one of the areas where most LMS create problems. For most universities/orgnaisations it is getting into the situation where the LMS (even Moodle) is approaching the “complex ERP system” problem used in the last quote above. Changing the LMS is to fraught with potential dangers that these changes can’t be made quickly. Most organisations don’t try, so we’re back to a Dilbert moment.

Hence, I think there are two problems facing universities trying to fulfil principle #3:

  1. Having the right people in the support and development team with the right experience, insight and judgement is not a simple thing and is directly opposed to the current common practice which is seeking to minimise having these people. Instead there’s reliance on helpdesk staff and trainers.
  2. The product problem. i.e. it’s too large and difficult to change quickly and safely. I think there’s some interesting work to be done here within Moodle and other open source LMS. How do you balance the “flexibility” of open source with the complexity of maintaining a stable institutional implementation?

References

Behrens, S. (2009). Shadow systems: the good, the bad and the ugly. Communications of the ACM, 52(2), 124-129.

Gregor, S., & Jones, D. (2007). The anatomy of a design theory. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 8(5), 312-335.

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