The life and death of Webfuse: What’s wrong with industrial e-learning and how to fix it

The following is a collection of presentation resources (i.e. the slides) for an ASCILITE’2012 of this paper. The paper and presentation are a summary of the outcomes my PhD work. The thesis goes into much more detail.

Abstract

Drawing on the 14-year life and death of an integrated online learning environment used by tens of thousands of people, this paper argues that many of the principles and practices underpinning industrial e-learning – the current dominant institutional model – are inappropriate. The paper illustrates how industrial e-learning can limit outcomes of tertiary e-learning and limits the abilities of universities to respond to uncertainty and effectively explore the future of learning. It limits their ability to learn. The paper proposes one alternate set of successfully implemented principles and practices as being more appropriate for institutions seeking to learn for the future and lead in a climate of change.

Slides

The slides are available on Slideshare and should show up below. These slides are the extended version, prior to the cutting required to fit within the 20 minute time limit.

References

Arnott, D. (2006). Cognitive biases and decision support systems development: a design science approach. Information Systems Journal, 16, 55–78.

Behrens, S., Jamieson, K., Jones, D., & Cranston, M. (2005). Predicting system success using the Technology Acceptance Model: A case study. 16th Australasian Conference on Information Systems. Sydney.

Brews, P., & Hunt, M. (1999). Learning to plan and planning to learn: Resolving the planning school/learning school debate. Strategic Management, 20(10), 889–913.

Cecez-Kecmanovic, D., Janson, M., & Brown, A. (2002). The rationality framework for a critical study of information systems. Journal of Information Technology, 17, 215–227.

Central Queensland University. (2004). Faculty teaching and learning report. Rockhampton, Australia.

Davenport, T. (1998). Putting the Enterprise into the Enterprise System. Harvard Business Review, 76(4), 121–131.

Dede, C. (2008). Theoretical perspectives influencing the use of information technology in teaching and learning. In J. Voogt & G. Knezek (Eds.), (pp. 43–59). New York: Springer.

Dillard, J., & Yuthas, K. (2006). Enterprise resource planning systems and communicative action. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 17(2-3), 202–223.

Fleming, P., & Spicer, A. (2003). Working at a cynical distance: Implications for power, subjectivity and resistance. Organization, 10(1), 157–179.

Haywood, T. (2002). Defining moments: Tension between richness and reach. In W. Dutton & B. Loader (Eds.), (pp. 39–49). London: Routledge.

Hutchins, E. (1991). Organizing work by adaptation. Organization Science, 2(1), 14–39.

Introna, L. (1996). Notes on ateleological information systems development. Information Technology & People, 9(4), 20–39.

Jamieson, K., & Hyland, P. (2006). Factors that influence Information Systems decisions and outcomes: A summary of key themes from four case studies. Adelaide, Australia.

Jones, D. (1996). Solving Some Problems of University Education: A Case Study. In R. Debreceny & A. Ellis (Eds.), Proceedings of AusWebÕ96 (pp. 243–252). Gold Coast, QLD: Southern Cross University Press.

Jones, D. (2002). Student Feedback, Anonymity, Observable Change and Course Barometers. In P. Barker & S. Rebelsky (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2002 (pp. 884–889). Denver, Colorado: AACE.

Jones, D. (2003). Course Barometers: Lessons gained from the widespread use of anonymous online formative evaluation. QUT, Brisbane.

Jones, D., & Buchanan, R. (1996). The design of an integrated online learning environment. In A. Christie, B. Vaughan, & P. James (Eds.), Making New Connections, asciliteÕ1996 (pp. 331–345). Adelaide.

Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Jones, N., & OÕShea, J. (2004). Challenging hierarchies: The impact of e-learning. Higher Education, 48, 379–395.

Katz, R. (2003). Balancing Technology and Tradition: The Example of Course Management Systems. EDUCAUSE Review, 38(4), 48–59.

Kurtz, C., & Snowden, D. (2007). Bramble Bushes in a Thicket: Narrative and the intangiables of learning networks. In M. Gibbert & T. Durand (Eds.), . Blackwell.

Laurillard, D. (2002). Rethinking University Teaching: A Conversational Framework for the Effective Use of Learning Technologies. London: Routledge.

Light, B., Holland, C. P., & Wills, K. (2001). ERP and best of breed: a comparative analysis. Business Process Management Journal, 7(3), 216–224.

March, J. (1991). Exploration and exploitation in organizational learning. Organization Science, 2(1), 71–87.

Mintzberg, H. (1989). Mintzberg on Management, Inside our Strange World of Organisations. New York: Free Press.

Morgan, Glenda. (2003). Faculty use of course management systems. Educause Centre for Applied Research.

Morgan, Glenn. (1992). Marketing discourse and practice: Towards a critical analysis. In M. Alvesson & H. Willmott (Eds.), (pp. 136–158). London: SAGE.

Pozzebon, M., Titah, R., & Pinsonneault, A. (2006). Combining social shaping of technology and communicative action theory for understanding rhetorical closuer in IT. Information Technology & People, 19(3), 244–271.

Robey, D., Ross, W., & Boudreau, M.-C. (2002). Learning to implement enterprise systems: An exploratory study of the dialectics of change. Journal of Management Information Systems, 19(1), 17–46.

Rossi, D., & Luck, J. (2011). Wrestling, wrangling and reaping: An exploration of educational practice and the transference of academic knowledge and skill in online learning contexts. Studies in Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development, 8(1), 60–75.

Seely Brown, J., Collins, A., & Duguid, P. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32–42.

Seely-Brown, J., & Hagel, J. (2005). From push to pull: The next frontier of innovation. The McKinsey Quarterly. McKinsey & Company.

Simon, H. (1991). Bounded rationality and organizational learning. Organization Science, 2(1), 125–134.

Sturgess, P., & Nouwens, F. (2004). Evaluation of online learning management systems. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 5(3).

Thomas, J. (2012). Universities canÕt all be the same – it’s time we embraced diversity. The Conversation. Retrieved June 28, 2012, from http://theconversation.edu.au/universities-cant-all-be-the-same-its-time-we-embraced-diversity-7379

Truex, Duane, Baskerville, R., & Travis, J. (2000). Amethodical systems development: the deferred meaning of systems development methods. Accounting Management and Information Technologies, 10, 53–79.

Truex, Duanne, Baskerville, R., & Klein, H. (1999). Growing systems in emergent organizations. Communications of the ACM, 42(8), 117–123.

Tversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (1974). Judgment under uncertainty: Heuristics and biases. Science, 185(4157), 1124–1131.

Underwood, J., & Dillon, G. (2011). Chasing dreams and recognising realities: teachersÕ responses to ICT. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 20(3), 317–330. doi:10.1080/1475939X.2011.610932

Wagner, E., Scott, S., & Galliers, R. (2006). The creation of Òbest practiceÓ software: Myth, reality and ethics. Information and Organization, 16(3), 251–275.

Weick, K., & Quinn, R. (1999). Organizational change and development. Annual Review of Psychology, 50, 361–386.

2 thoughts on “The life and death of Webfuse: What’s wrong with industrial e-learning and how to fix it

  1. Pingback: The life and death of Webfuse: What’s wrong with industrial e-learning and how to fix it | Gamification of VET | Scoop.it

  2. Pingback: #ascilite2012 technical support and the tail wagging the dog « The Weblog of (a) David Jones

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s