The four paths for implementing learning analytics and enhancing the quality of learning and teaching

The following is a place holder for two presentations that are related. They are:

  1. “Four paths for learning analytics: Moving beyond a management fashion”; and,

    An extension of Beer et al (2014) (e.g. there are four paths now, rather than three) that’s been accepted to Moodlemoot’AU 2015.

  2. “The four paths for implementing learning analytics and enhancing the quality of learning and teaching”;

    A USQ research seminar that is part a warm up of the Moot presentation, but also an early attempt to extend the 4 paths idea beyond learning analytics and into broader institutional attempts to improve learning and teaching.

Eventually the slides and other resources from the presentations will show up here. What follows is the abstract for the second talk.

Slides for the MootAU15 presentation

Only 15 minutes for this talk. Tried to distill the key messages. Thanks to @catspyjamasnz the talk was captured on Periscope

Slides for the USQ talk

Had the luxury of an hour for this talk. Perhaps to verbose.

Abstract

Baskerville and Myers (2009) define a management fashion as “a relatively transitory belief that a certain management technique leads rational management progress” (p. 647). Maddux and Cummings (2004) observe that “education has always been particularly susceptible to short-lived, fashionable movements that come suddenly into vogue, generate brief but intense enthusiasm and optimism, and fall quickly into disrepute and abandonment” (p. 511). Over recent years learning analytics has been looming as one of the more prominent fashionable movements in educational technology. Illustrated by the apparent engagement of every institution and vendor in some project badged with the label learning analytics. If these organisations hope to successfully harness learning analytics to address the challenges facing higher education, then it is important to move beyond the slavish adoption of the latest fashion and aim for more mindful innovation.

Building on an earlier paper (Beer, Tickner, & Jones, 2014) this session will provide a conceptual framework to aid in moving learning analytics projects beyond mere fashion. The session will identify, characterize, and explain the importance of four possible paths for learning analytics: “do it to” teachers; “do it for” teachers; “do it with” teachers; and, teachers “DIY”. Each path will be illustrated with concrete examples of learning analytics projects from a number of universities. Each of these example projects will be analysed using the IRAC framework (Jones, Beer, & Clark, 2013) and other lenses. That analysis will be used to identify the relative strengths, weaknesses, and requirements of each of the four paths. The analysis will also be used to derive implications for the decision-makers, developers, instructional designers, teachers, and other stakeholders involved in both learning analytics, and learning and teaching.

It will be argued that learning analytics projects that follow only one of the four paths are those most likely to be doomed to mere fashion. It will argue that moving a learning analytics project beyond mere fashion will require a much greater focus on the “do it with” and “DIY” paths. An observation that is particularly troubling when almost all organizational learning analytics projects appear focused primarily on either the “do it to” or “do it for” paths.

Lastly, the possibility of connections between this argument and the broader problem of enhancing the quality of learning and teaching will be explored. Which paths are used by institutional attempts to improve learning and teaching? Do the paths used by institutions inherently limit the amount and types of improvements that are possible? What implications might this have for both research and practice?

References

Baskerville, R. L., & Myers, M. D. (2009). Fashion waves in information systems research and practice. MIS Quarterly, 33(4), 647–662.

Beer, C., Tickner, R., & Jones, D. (2014). Three paths for learning analytics and beyond : moving from rhetoric to reality. In B. Hegarty, J. McDonald, & S. Loke (Eds.), Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on educational technology. Proceedings ascilite Dunedin 2014 (pp. 242–250).

Jones, D., Beer, C., & Clark, D. (2013). The IRAC framwork: Locating the performance zone for learning analytics. In H. Carter, M. Gosper, & J. Hedberg (Eds.), Electric Dreams. Proceedings ascilite 2013 (pp. 446–450). Sydney, Australia.

Maddux, C., & Cummings, R. (2004). Fad, fashion, and the weak role of theory and research in information technology in education. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 12(4), 511–533.

42 thoughts on “The four paths for implementing learning analytics and enhancing the quality of learning and teaching

  1. David,

    As always thoughtful and well reasoned! But what about students? Why not “do it for students” or even “do it with students” or (heaven forbid) allow students to use the data themselves? (of course with appropriate confidentiality and anonymity) – ie why not provide analytics information direct to students so they can compare their learning strategies with other (successful) learners? Wouldn’t this encourage more independent and deep learning rather than pretend that academic staff have the time to micro-manage every learner?

    More power to you in striving to go beyond the fad!

    1. Thanks for the comment Ian. That question is one we have to cover in the presentation. I’m hoping there’ll be a blog post outlining that part of the argument in the coming weeks.

      The summary of the argument is that a focus on the student shouldn’t be ignored, but that a focus on the teacher provides a range of benefits that make it a better initial focus. Especially when it comes to learning analytics that are directly tied to the specific learning activities designed into courses, rather than the type of generic learning analytics currently being focused upon. Those general approaches to learning analytics can proceed, but when trying to get specific we think there needs to be a much greater focus on the teacher.

    2. Yes, I agree that is a good ‘path’ to go down. There is certainly useful information in analytics for staff development and curriculum reform.

  2. Pingback: Me as learner: 2015 and learning analytics | The Weblog of (a) David Jones

  3. Pingback: What might a project combining LX Design and Analaytics look like? | The Weblog of (a) David Jones

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