The perceived uselessness of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for e-learning

Below you will find the slides, abstract, and references for a talk given to folk from the University of South Australia on 1 October, 2015. A later blog post outlines core parts of the argument.

Slides

Abstract

In a newspaper article (Laxon, 2013), Professor Mark Brown described e-learning as

a bit like teenage sex. Everyone says they’re doing it but not many people are and those that are doing it are doing it very poorly.

This is not a new problem with a long litany of publications spread over decades bemoaning the limited adoption of new technology-based pedagogical practices (e-learning). The dominant theoretical model used in research seeking to understand the adoption decisions of both staff and students has been the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Šumak, Heričko, & Pušnik, 2011). TAM views an individual’s intention to adopt a particular digital technology as being most heavily influenced by two factors: perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. This presentation will explore and illustrate the perceived uselessness of TAM for understanding and responding to e-learning’s “teenage sex” problem using the BAD/SET mindsets (Jones & Clark, 2014) and experience from four years of teaching large, e-learning “rich” courses. The presentation will also seek to offer initial suggestions and ideas for addressing e-learning’s “teenage sex” problem.

References

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One thought on “The perceived uselessness of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for e-learning

  1. Pingback: University e-learning: Removing the context and adding the sediment | The Weblog of (a) David Jones

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